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SEA TURTLE PROJECCT

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                             WHAT WE DO
Early every morning is when we go on rubbish patrol along the beach, putting litter and washed-up trash into bags that will later be removed by the municipality. Turtles and other marine life on the Lebanese coast are threatened by pollution that includes plastic bags, hospital waste, factory chemicals and fertiliser run-off from farms. Plastic bags in the water can suffocate turtles, which mistake them for jelly fish and try to eat them.
During the nesting season, we also look for tracks of turtles and their efforts to camouflage their nests. Once we find the eggs, which need 45 to 60 days to incubate, we remove some sand and lay a one square metre metal grid over them, anchored with iron hooks. This keeps out dogs and foxes, but leaves holes big enough for hatchlings to get out. Sometimes we relocate the nests further up the beach if they are in danger of flooding from the sea or if they are too shallow.
To get a clear picture of how sea turtles behave during the nesting season and what their needs and preferences are, we collect scientific data, which can also be fed, into bigger surveys on Mediterranean Sea turtles.

We count the nests and measure how far each one is from the sea and from the nearest vegetation. We measure the size and weight of sample eggs, which are about as big as ping-pong balls. We record how many nests are raided before the eggs hatch and try to rescue any survivors.

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